zorkian: A picture of Oliver sitting up with his Dreamwidth onesie on! (Default)
Mark Smith ([personal profile] zorkian) wrote2012-01-09 22:34

Chase banking shenanigans

A month ago, I had two separate charges appear in my bank account:

12/01/2011    $167.76     ACADEMY SPORTS #7 HOUSTO     11/30ACADEMY STRN: 054813
12/05/2011    $150.00     ACADEMY SPORTS #10 HOUST     12/03ACADEMY STRN: 012816


Okay. So, based on the name here, these were made to Academy Sports which is a chain of stores all over the south. The stores seem to exist, and in fact, are just a few miles from each other down in sunny Houston, TX.

Let's take a moment and think about this, though. Texas... in late November/early December... oh gee, wait a second, I'm not sure that makes sense. In fact, I'm pretty sure it doesn't:



Yeah, my bad. I had a kid that was 7-10 days old at the time of these charges. I was most definitely sitting at home partaking of the restful sleep of ... wait ... no, actually. I was cranky and tired and most definitely, absolutely, nowhere near Houston, TX.

Well, thankfully, I've been on this rodeo before. I called up Chase and talked. They issued the credits and I went about my business of getting a new debit card. Annoying, but most definitely not the end of the world. This kind of thing happens and we had a pretty bad rash of card theft in my city over the past few months. It's annoying but no harm done.

So I thought, anyway, until today. Today, I got a nice letter from my bank -- Chase. They let me know, in no uncertain terms, that these were authorized charges and that they'd be re-debiting my accounts for the hundreds of dollars that I spent in Houston.

Exciting. I guess tomorrow I will have to make some telephone calls and put on my Angry Face?
synecdochic: torso of a man wearing jeans, hands bound with belt (Default)

[personal profile] synecdochic 2012-01-10 07:20 (UTC)(link)
Well, they say that new parents often (in their cranky and sleep-deprived state) forget what they were doing as soon as they do it. Maybe you sleep-flew to Houston and went shopping?

(Seriously, though, they do online ordering too. Any chance you placed an order online?)
synecdochic: torso of a man wearing jeans, hands bound with belt (Default)

[personal profile] synecdochic 2012-01-10 07:29 (UTC)(link)
*nod* I figured you probably had already considered this, but I thought I'd mention it anyway!

(I still think you should make sure you didn't sleep-travel though. *G*)
dreamatdrew: (Daria)

[personal profile] dreamatdrew 2012-01-10 10:11 (UTC)(link)
Credit transactions from Academy's online storefront do not show up as from "#$StoreNumber $City", from personal experience. Those are physical POS charges.
jeshyr: Blessed are the broken. Harry Potter. (Default)

[personal profile] jeshyr 2012-01-10 08:01 (UTC)(link)
How exactly do they determine that these are "authorised" purchases anyway?? That sounds very much like Angry Face is needed, or at least Angry Voice unless these folks have video phones.
dreamatdrew: (Ragabash)

[personal profile] dreamatdrew 2012-01-10 10:15 (UTC)(link)
I know people in Houston, should you need fist-shaking proxies.....
kaisa: (Default)

[personal profile] kaisa 2012-01-10 11:40 (UTC)(link)
I worked for a credit card issuer/acquirer for some years, and I think you're still on the regular automated thing that happens when you deny you made a transaction. First you deny, your bank sends a chargeback message to the merchant's acquirer, then the merchant's acquirer sends back proof and your bank tells you you're paying. Now you deny it again and ask to see the proof. After that you might actually get a human to look at the case. If you still deny it was you after seeing the proof, your bank asks if you want them to report it to the police, you say yes, and at least in my country, you get your money back.

They make it that long because often people forget they've done transactions and once they see the proof, they realize that it *was* actually them. Also, many merchants send the transactions late, and have errors in the transaction dates and such, and once they dig out the receipts, they realize that the transaction happened half a year ago, or year ago, and then the customer realizes that they did actually buy something a year ago, and that was never charged until now. Sometimes transactions get stuck between the merchant and the customer for months due to errors in the transaction information and get processed only after someone manually fixes the transaction information, if anyone bothers to do that at all.

Things you can ask about these transactions: Was the card holder present or not during the transactions? Was the card physically present or not? How were they authorized? PIN or signature? If signature, ask to see it. If the card was present, did they use magnet stripe or chip? Did the store check your ID? All transactions carry this kind of security information on them.

Also, at least Visa and MasterCard consider that the merchant pays for any frauds that happen if the store accepts signature instead of PIN, or skips ID verification when signature is used, etc, since they're skipping existing security measures.

If the transaction was done in the internet, you can always ask to get your card added to the Verified by Visa or Mastercard Securecode or whatever additional security system your credit card brand has. That way again it's merchant's fault if they choose not to use these existing security measures, since you and your issuer have enabled it on your card.

I don't know about the laws on credit cards in your country, so I don't really know if you're screwed or not, but in my country you would get your money back.
Edited (Thousands of typos) 2012-01-10 14:04 (UTC)
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[personal profile] pne 2012-01-11 08:17 (UTC)(link)
If the transaction was done in the internet, you can always ask to get your card added to the Verified by Visa or Mastercard Securecode or whatever additional security system your credit card brand has. That way again it's merchant's fault if they choose not to use these existing security measures, since you and your issuer have enabled it on your card.

Conversely, if someone sniffs (or phishes, or guesses) your VbV/SC PIN, it's your fault if someone abuses the card because the fact that the code was used "proves" that it was you. (Or so I am told.)
zarhooie: Girl on a blueberry bramble looking happy. Text: Kat (Default)

[personal profile] zarhooie 2012-01-11 05:08 (UTC)(link)
That sucks, yo. I hope you can get it straightened out!
asciident: (Default)

[personal profile] asciident 2012-01-11 10:32 (UTC)(link)
That stinks. My CU debit card people freak out about any unexpected charges (repeated transactions of the same place/thing, locations it doesn't expect me to be, etc) and always call me up to verify. And my credit cards require advance notification if I intend to use them outside of my home region else they freak out too, and my credit cards are from regular old banks (Citi, BofA). While you're jumping through all the hoops --and this is just one of the hoops because they contacted the merchant who wants to claim these are legit or they get dinged-- think about bringing up the fact that you didn't put in a travel authorization for Houston any time in the last X time period?
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[personal profile] highlander_ii 2012-01-11 16:38 (UTC)(link)
Chase told you that b/c the merchant - the sports store - told *them* that the purchases were legit. They 'challenged' the chargeback. Tell Chase that 'no, really, not mine' and they'll have to do more investigating.

Also - Chase is a rat-bastard organization of doom. But that's just my opinion from dealing with them on a professional level (they were one of our clients at my old job and they are a pain in the ASS).